Best Practice from Chuck Nalon

Chuck Nalon, Miniat Meats and Gavin Tierney, BiMeda.

At the end of our Vistage group meeting day we now share Best Practices. If a member has learned something he or she thinks could be of interest to others in the group, we make time on the agenda for sharing these insights.

This is a cool ritual, or  ‘inclusion exercise’, as it spreads the conversation around so we hear from others in addition to our significant event check-in at the start of our meeting day, or host presentation and process of an individual issue.

Chuck Nalon, president Ed Miniat Meats,  reported on an effective program his HR director is implementing that is resulting in expanding their employee candidate pool and has already resulted in the hiring of eight employees.

Employee hiring and retention are big issues for our members. This one idea could be a game-changer. Chuck says the team empowered to implement this program is inspired by making a difference for the greater good. He’s also convinced it will lessen employee turnover, a costly line-item for all businesses.

Here’s Chuck’s magic idea of the day thanks to his company participation in the Harkin Summit on Global Disability Employment: 

Click below for Chuck’s report on a new hiring program:

Watch Vistage member Chuck Nalon share this Best Practice!

 

Interested in more information about this idea, Vistage or our group? Email me: juliegammack@me.com

 

 

Why do some people get folks to say ‘yes’ and others don’t?

Dean Minuto has it all figured out.

This award-winning Vistage speaker appeared before our group several years ago and when I heard he had a new talk, I immediately booked him for a return engagement.

When Dean gave his first presentation to our group, one of my members had a big sales pitch he was going to make the next day so almost

minutopixdecided to skip our Vistage meeting because he thought he ought to spend the day preparing for the pitch. Instead, he DID come to our meeting, and it’s a decision he says earned him $12 million.

Why? He completely re-worked his materials and re-ordered what he was  going  to say to the prospective client, after learning from Dean how people make buying decisions.

He realized he needed to spend LESS time about his company and all the wonderful things they do and spend MORE time addressing the clients’ fears and concerns. That’s an oversimplification, of course, but Dean Minuto’s presentation gave our member a new way of looking at how their company made sales presentations and he saw he needed to make a dramatic overhaul.

As a result, the member won a $12 million dollar contract he had previously thought was a long-shot of earning.

Dean will be our speaker on December 12 from 8:30 until noon in the conference room of RMF Engineering, 5520 Research Park Drive, Baltimore (in the UMBC Office Park).  If you are the CEO or decision-maker for your organization and have an interest in exploring Vistage membership and would like an invitation to hear him speak, email me: jegammack@gmail.com

Don’t bother if you have all the business you want and everyone around you does what you want them to do.

Smile.

Steve Jobs…

I watched ‘Steve Jobs: One Last Thing’ last night and keep thinking about something he said in an interview when he was a much younger man. It was when he realized the world had been shaped by people who weren’t any smarter than he was and how much that ah-ha (my words, not his) propelled him to extraordinary accomplishments. Here’s the clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Iw_G4O8THA

Image 

At about the six-month mark of a Vistage members’ anniversary with the group I’ll check in and ask them how their experience matches what their expectations were prior to joining us. 

A common response is: It’s great to see I’m not the only one dealing with these issues. Maybe I’m not so dumb after all.

What the rest of his or her world would be shocked to learn is that some of the most successful people today are shadowed by the thought that they really aren’t as smart as people think they are. Some how they are a fraud. They just got lucky. 

The transformation in that moment can lead to a self-acceptance and confidence that can cause the member to grow exponentially. 

 

On-boarding three new members tomorrow

Merit Gest www.meritgest.com Onboarding Specialist

Merit Gest
www.meritgest.com
Onboarding Specialist

Our Vistage group will have three new members starting tomorrow so I’m taking advice from Vistage speaker Merit Gest who gives an eye-opening presentation about on-boarding newcomers to an organization. As a result,  I’m spending a little more  time preparing for their arrival.  (Vistage works)

Vistage itself is a rather unusual business model. The customer is also the product.  Vistage is an international organization but for the member it is what we chairs show them it is in our small groups of 12-16. The loyalty is not to the brand but to their fellow members and chair.  And it is the group culture that creates the member experience  so it is critical we chairs select the right fit and then set the context for what’s expected of members. As for member selection, we need to make sure we have a variety of personality styles, diversity in skill-sets, gender, age, and type of business. I will have two very young entrepreneurs in my group, and although their employee-size is much smaller than many around the table, they will bring a point-of-view that will be critical in the strategic thinking process of the rest of the group.

I’ve witnessed a question from a 30-year-old to a 63-year-old alter the course of the elder’s business.

I’m assembling notebooks for not only the new members but am making one for everyone in the group as a reminder of the basics.  It will include a copy of our group norms (always a good thing to revisit), forms for outlining how we process an issue and our one-to-one coaching meeting. I’ll include a template about what a Host Presentation needs to look like and an explanation of what our monthly check-in should entail. This is a good reminder for all of us.

I’m assigning an existing member to each newcomer with the task of making sure they are introduced to everyone else and have their questions answered. I’ll seat the two of them side by side.

I also sent the newcomers an email letting them know to dress casually. This may seem like a small detail, but it’s not, according to Gest. It’s important to let newcomers know the standards and culture in advance. You don’t want an employee showing up dressed casually when the culture is more formal, nor in our case, do you want someone sitting around in a coat and tie on the first day when everyone else is wearing a Polo shirt. The faster they feel as if they are one of the tribe, the faster they will open up and jump on in.

Speaker Gest makes a compelling case about the ROI of successful on-boarding of newcomers. She walks members through an exercise that demonstrates the cost of turnover and that successfully on-boarding newcomers can make a big difference in employee satisfaction and retention.

Same principle applies to new Vistage members.

Here’s our group culture guide:

Vistage 3399

1. OPENNESS. BRINGS REAL ISSUES TO THE GROUP

2. SHOWS UP. PHYSICALLY AND BY THEIR INTENTIONS

3. PRACTICES ‘CARE-FRONTATION’: DON’T HOLD BACK

4. COMMITTED TO GROWTH OF THEIR BUSINESS AS WELL AS  OTHER MEMBERS IN THE GROUP

5. TAKES OWNERSHIP OF WHO JOINS THE GROUP WHEN THERE ARE OPENINGS BY INVITING CANDIDATES, INTERVIEWING PROSPECTS AND WELCOMING NEWCOMERS.

6. EACH MEMBER HAS MUCH TO CONTRIBUTE AS WELL AS GAIN.

7. HAS FUN IN AND OUTSIDE THE ROOM

8. HOLDS GROUP ANNUAL GROUP RETREAT

9. HOLDS THE MEMBERS AND CHAIR ACCOUNTABLE

Tomorrow, I’m going to ask one of the members of our group to read this list. It will be included in the notebooks I’m preparing for new and existing members. Some times I even tape it to the wall inside the restrooms where our meeting is being held.

And, yes, we DO have fun inside and outside the room together.

Julie

P.S. If you’re a chair, please add any thoughts about how you onboard new members!